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A Most Odd Off Season

Strange wedding.

Yes. Very strange. Come along.
– The King and Queen from The Princess Bride

Well, baseball started today. . .I think. It’s been a most unusual off season. Baseball ends with the last out of the World Series. This is typically in October, but occasionally spills over into November. (Exciting times when the team plays in an open air stadium in a Northern climate.) It starts with the first pitch on Opening Day. Typically in April, but occasionally as early as late March.

That means that the off season is 5 months long. Typically about 150 days.

This year? The Washington Nationals won their first World Series on October 31, 2019 by beating the cheating Houston Astros. (Seriously, they cheated and lots of people are still upset.)

Today was opening day, July 23, 2020. It’s been 267 days. It’s been so long I don’t even remember when opening day was supposed to happen. I think it was sometime in March, but frankly it’s still too painful to go back and look.

Being a Seattle Mariners fan, I have two annual traditions. Each year I spent $120 for the ability to watch all 162 Mariners games over the internet. This year, I spent my money, but of course, opening day was postponed and they gave me back my money. (I would rather have had the games.)

The second tradition is I import the Mariners’ schedule into my calendar. So, I have 162 appointments, each with an meeting notification telling me who the Mariners are playing.

And for the last three months, about 5 days a week I get a pop up reminder that we are still not playing baseball.

You would think that I would be looking forward to Opening Day. . .Delayed.

I was. . .and I wasn’t.

My first child, a daughter, was born in 1989. My second child, also a daughter, was born four years later in 1993. Six years later, my lovely wife was pregnant with our third child. The ultrasound said it was a boy. Being a lifelong scouter, you’d think I would be excited.

I was. . .and I wasn’t.

I refused to let myself believe our third child was a boy. It’s not that I DISbelieved. I just didn’t allow myself to accept that it was really happening. That was until 2000 when my son was born.

That’s what Opening Day 2020 has been like for me. I didn’t pay for the broadcast ($45 now, since at 60 games, it’s less than 1/3 of the regular schedule.) I also have not imported the revised Mariners schedule. Their first game is tomorrow and it will happen, but I’m mostly going to wait and see.

Tomorrow’s not promised to anyone and in 2020 who can say what the next sunrise will bring?

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

Follow him on
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or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Knock On Wood . . .For IT

If the good Lord is willing and the creek don’t rise

I’m not sure I should be posting this yet. But, I’ll knock on wood.

We’re in the middle of a migration. We are upgrading a key program on our agents’ computers. The migration started last week. We are continuing this week and we’ll finish up next week.

We’ve been planning this migration for six months. In fairness, three of those months were “on hold” because of COVID. But, it’s been a long time.

The real challenge has been to upgrade software that is sitting on computers in people’s homes. In addition, we needed a solution that didn’t require a lot of time from our agents and didn’t require our agents to become IT experts.

We came up with a solution about two weeks ago. Our engineers did. We tested it and it did everything we needed it to. The agents only need to log in to start the migration. We built in checks to help us identify if something goes wrong.

The first week we did one site in North Carolina. It went off perfectly. This week we are doing a site in Utah and one in Alabama. Next week we do the last two sites.

And so far so good. The migrations have gone exactly as we planned them.

Are you superstitious? Do you know if you are?

Do you ever “knock on wood”?

Do you know why?

Generally, it’s something we say (and do) when we don’t want anything to go wrong.

The migration is going well. Knock on wood.

It’s just a saying, right? I mean it’s like the one I posted at the beginning.

Hopefully we’ll finish the migration without any issue. If the good Lord is willing and the creek don’t rise.

But, they aren’t the same. One is superstitious, one is not.

knocking on wood is an ancient tradition. It’s religous, mystic even. Ancient cultures such as the Celts and the Druids believed spirits lived in trees. Knocking on the wood calls forth the spirit to assist you in whatever you are trying to do.

So, when I say, “The migration is going well. Knock on wood,” I’m really asking the spirit in the wood to come out and help my migration go well.

And, of course we are afraid to say something good, like “the migration is going well” for fear that we will jinx it. And that is also superstitious, of course. Not surprisingly it originated with baseball players, one of the most superstitious group of people in the history of sports.

We use an ancient superstition to combat a modern one.

Tomorrow we continue our migration. Knock on wood. Hopefully it continues to go well. If the good Lord is willing and the creek don’t rise.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Put A Plant In Your Office They Said

It’s supposed to help your office feel homier. Of course, that was before our homes were our offices, and our offices are our homes. For a long time we had trouble keeping plants in our house alive.

We now have one of those plants that grows really long. Actually we have two. And they are really long. And we have a spider plant. And another plant that I don’t know the name of. But, it’s really green.

By a weird coincidence our plant-lives started increasing as our children got older. So, we have plenty of plants in our house. But, my office is not near any of them.

So, I got a plant for my office. I thought a lot about what I wanted to get. At work I have a fairly level headed demeanor. I’m calm in crisis. And I’m known as someone easy to work with.

What isn’t clear is that I think through every decision, every interaction, every impression. It’s not like I’m paranoid. And I don’t spend a lot of time playing office politics. But, when I do play them, I’m really good. I’m better than a lot of people.

However, most people don’t consider the situation at work from a critical standpoint. They don’t consider how every decision affects their continued interactions.

You know what? I might be completely up in night. I might be overanalysing my interactions. I might be the only one playing office politics.

But, either way it’s how I approach work. And I decided to get a plant that reflected that approach.

I got a desert cactus.

It seems fitting.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Dilbert During The Quarantine

I had a moment yesterday where for the briefest moment I was lost. Not lost on the map. I was lost on the calendar.

Like many of you, I’ve been working from home for weeks. . .months. And like many of you, my home life has blended into my work life. I’m on salary, so I don’t have to keep track of my hours. I’m on salary so I don’t get to keep track of my hours.

And let’s face it. None of us walk into the office at 8:00am, close the door and emerge at 5:00pm. That’s not how “work at home” works. We end up dealing with kids. And the plumber. And getting the mail. And WHAT IS THAT NOISE? And a million other distractions. The good news is that statistics show that even with the interruptions we are giving our employers more hours than they are paying us for.

Well, that’s kind of a good thing. It means we aren’t slacking off. But, it also means we are working, and stressing more than we were when we went to the office.

One my stress relievers is a Dilbert desk calendar. You know, the kind that has one strip per day? Every year I ask for one for Christmas and every year I end up buying myself one in January.

I used to have a friend that had one and I would look at his and randomly leaf through the days reading comics at random. My friend never did. Once I got my own copy I understood why. That daily comic is like a little scoop of ice cream. And it’s the newness of it that makes it tasty.

I left my Dilbert calendar in my office when I started working from home. I retrieved it today. That was a lot of ice cream to eat. The last day I was in the office was Monday March 16. That was 126 days ago. There are only 164 days left in the year.

The amount of pages I removed was nearly as many as I left.

It’s strange to think about returning to my office. In fact, I walked in and my monitors were face down on my desk. The drawers were open and a picture had been knocked off the wall.

Despite the fact that the door was locked it looked like someone had gone through my office. Hard to believe considering the amount of security our building has.

I was more than a little annoyed until I started thinking about the last 126 days. On March 18, 2020, a 5.7 magnitude earthquake hit Southwest Salt Lake City. It was centered in Magna, Utah, just South of the airport.

My office building is in Southwest Salt Lake City, just South of the airport and just East of Magna. It wasn’t a buglar that had trashed my office. It was an earthquake that rattled our building pretty good. . .two days after I started working from home.

So, Dilbert is no safely installed on my home office desk. And I’m seriously wondering if I will ever return to the office.

Oh, and yesterday I took a Sunday afternoon nap. I woke up in a panic because I was sleeping in the middle of a workday. I really needed Dilbert to tell me it was still the weekend.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Book Review: Garth Brooks The Anthology | Part III

Recently I did a book review on Garth Brooks The Anthology | Part I. Since I’m now doing a review of Garth Brooks The Anthology | Part III, you might think that you missed a review for Garth Brooks The Anthology | Part II.

I thought I’d missed it too when I saw Garth Brooks The Anthology | Part III on the shelf. I’m sometimes a “Collect All The Things” guy. I hated to think I’d missed the second installment.

I later found out that Garth Brooks decided to skip Part II and go straight to Part III. I didn’t ever find a reason why. But, it made sense in a way after reading Part III. Where Part I focused on the first five years of Brooks’ career, Part III focuses on his live performances.

And one of the things that becomes obvious in reading through the 255 oversized pages, is that Brooks had a very definite planto how he was planning on running his career. From what he wanted his stage shows to look like to how he intended to take his music to television, Europe and Australia.

One area that Brooks seems to have not known what to expect, or been able to polan for was his concert in New York’s Central Park It’s the opening chapter in the book and it’s a compelling story. Eventually, we learn, along with Brooks that his concert in Central Park was the largest concert in history. At least the largest in New York history. Nearly 800,000 people attended.

Garth Brooks was the most popular recording artist in history. He’s sold over 100,000,000 albumns. And as amazing as his studio career was, his live shows were even more impressive. And the book captures that the spirit of those live shows, in words and pictures.

What I Liked

Much as in the first Anthology installment, Brooks’ voice comes through well in the storytelling. Personally, I’ve never been to a live Garth Brooks show. I didn’t even see his television specials. So, all of the material in the book was new to me. But, I’m also a big Garth Brooks fan, so this book was like reading a new installment in a series you’ve already become a fan of: same characters, new settings.

What I Didn’t

Part III, lacked some of the cohesion and flow that the first book had. By starting with the Central Park Concert the book felt like ti started in the middle of the story. We went from the high point of Central Park back to the very beginning of his career where he’s just a guy trying to form a band.

I understand why they told the story the way that they did, and it “worked.” But, it also felt somewhat contrived. In many ways there was no natural progression of one live event to the next. And in some cases there was. Obviously, you go from playing bars to clubs to opening act to headliner. But, trying to tie the growth of the act to various live events in a progression didn’t always work.

What It Means To You

If you are a Garth Brooks fan, especially one of the millions that attended his live events, you’ll undoubtedly enjoy this book. You will learn information about how performing groups get created and how stage shows get put together. If you are not a fan, the story may not be enough to keep you engaged.

My Rating

3 out of 4 stars

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Yes, But If You Hold His Nose Under He’ll Drink Eventually

You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

My mother owned a CPA firm back in the 1990s. I was working for Microsoft at the time writing courseware on Microsoft Exchange.

My mother’s office didn’t have an email system.

Mom, why don’t you let me install Exchange. It won’t cost you anything and it will help your employees be more productive.

We don’t need an email system. We have plenty of those red “While You Were Out” message pads.

You have to understand, my mother’s office was actually very technically advanced. They had a network and a central repository for client tax returns at a time when many offices were still working exclusively with paper. But, she just didn’t see the need for an electronic email system.

I eventually got her to use it, but only by winning a bet.

My office recently rolled out a new collaboration product from Adobe. Our network is very secure. Our firewalls deny all requests unless we have specifically whitelisted an IP address. Getting this product in was an involved process.

First we had to get our security team to sign off on it. Then we had to get the client’s security team to sign off on it. Then, we had to open ports in the firewall. And because our agents cannot type web addresses, we had to hard code the location into the start menu.

The tool lets managers and agents share a screen and listen to past calls for coaching purposes. We used to do this by having the manager walk to the agent’s desk.

COVID

Now, the manager and the agent might be in different cities. Technically, they could even be in different states.

Anyway, after several false starts we finally got the product installed, tested and configured. But, the trouble was getting the managers to trust it. They actually were required to use it, but like the horse coming to the water trough, they were hesitant.

That was three weeks ago. Today I was talking with one of the senior managers,

How is the Adobe product working?

The managers absolutely love it. It took them a little to figure it out, but at this point, they can’t imagine life without it.

Often that’s how new technically works. Well, and old technology as well. Remember Mom’s accounting firm?

Tell you what, Mom. Let me install it and I guarantee that two weeks from now, they will threaten to quit if you say you are going to take it out.

Okay.

It wasn’t even two weeks.

Oh, and in case you are wondering, NO, I did not just compare my mother to a horse. And I can’t believe you would even think such a thing!

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Following A 2000 Year Old Tradition

Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book
– Cicero. M Tullius circa 43 BC

Okay, maybe the tradition is 2,063 years old if we are to believe Cicero was the first to have this thought.

I’ve been “writing a book” for years.

Billy Joel was once asked about the characters in his song “Piano Man.”

“Every character in that song is based on a real person.

“What’s a real estate novelist?”

“Right, ‘Paul was a real estate novelist.’ He was this guy named ‘Paul’ who sold sold real estate. And we asked him, ‘So when you aren’t selling real estate what do you do?’

‘I’m writing a book.’ So that was a real estate novelist.”

It’s been a while since X-Files went off the air. One of the most interesting character in X-Files was a guy simply referred to as Cigerette Smoking Man. In the final seasons he came to symbolize the “others,” the “them” that FBI agent Fox Mulder was trying to expose. He was a seriously creepy character played brilliantly by actor William B. Davis. He’s especially creepy because we don’t know anything about him. We only know that he seems to know everything and he smokes cigerettes constantly. Often directly under the “NO SMOKING SIGN.”

Anyway, at the end of the series. As the storyline is being wrapped up we see the Cigerette Smoking Man at “home.” It’s a lonely hotel room. He has just gotten a rejection letter for a novel that he’d written.

I’ll tell you, every writer watched that scene and just felt terrible. We’ve all been there. We poured our heart and soul into something and the gatekeepers decided it just wants good enough. That one scene completely changed the Cigerette Smoking Man. He went from a threatening menance, to a failed writer. Talk about a twist.

My point is that I’ve started seriously working on my novel. Actually it’s a series of novels. Since you dear readers have put up with my scribblings to this point, I will presume to impose on you both as a sounding board and also an source for accountability. As I start this trip.

I’ve written books in the past. They were technical books. I wrote three and two were published. This is my first foray into fiction. I’ve always loved Science Fiction and that’s the story that I’m going to tell first.

Here’s a brief overview of the setting and the story.

The story is set on a planet named Syren. Yup, that’s a reference to the Sirens who tempt Odysseus in Homer’s Odyssey. The tie-in is that everyone on Syren is deaf, except for a few rebels. Our hero is a young man who can hear and must lead his two friends on a desperate mission to rescue a young boy before he will be surgically deafened.

It’s a little Percy Jackson, some Fellowship of the Ring, and definitely a touch of Harry, Ron and Hermoine from Harry Potter.

I don’t think I’ve talked here about my involvement with the deaf community. I’ve known sign language since I was about 15 years old. I spent two years working exclusively with deaf people as a missionary in Chicago. And I have many lifelong friends who are deaf or interpreters.

Deaf peole navigate a world that is designed for us “hearing.” I’m looking forward to building a world designed for deaf people. While a deaf person cannot pretend to be a hearing person, a skilled enough hearing person can pass themselves off as a deaf person. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a serious insult and even when I was that talented, I would never dream of telling someone I was deaf when I wasn’t. But, I also don’t live on Syren, where being hearing is a crime punishable by surgury, or even death.

Anyway, it will be a few weeks before I’m ready to post a chapter, but I’m excited to take you all along this journey. Both the writing, and the adventure.

If you have questions about the story, or suggestions feel free to leave them in the comments.

And let me know if you’ve ever thought of writing a book.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

Follow him on
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or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Writers Write. It’s Not Always Much, But It’s What We Do

I’m not sure if I felt like he was insulting my experience. Was I feeling he was disrespecting my position?

I don’t know.

The conversation was between my lovely wife, one of my adult children and myself. I’d written a response to an agreement that we’d entered into. My remarks were blunt without being bullying. Clear, but not overly accusatory.

My child didn’t agree. And the response took an interesting turn.

This is clearly emotional and biased!

Well, I’ll agree it’s based on my own bias, but it’s not emotional.

OH YES IT IS! If you were to show this to any English teacher. . .

You realize that was written by a professional writer, right?

Later my lovely wife suggested my response was not helpful. It was more tit-for-tat and seemed to come from a defensiveness on my part. I’ve been thinking about that for the last few days, trying to decide if she’s right.

The argument my child was making is called an Appeal To Authority logic fallacy. The idea that “an expert” would agree with them. My issue with the argument is that I really am an expert.

That sounds arrogant. I think it sounds arrogant, and I’m supposed to be the great writer.

As a famous conservative commentator likes to say,

Facts don’t care about your feelings.

But, that doesn’t mean all statement of facts are created equal. For example, never play chess for money against an Englishman who claims he “plays a bit.” It’s fact, but not like saying, “I achieved the rank of grand master when I was 21.”

Writers write. It’s what we do. Maybe it’s a blogger. Maybe it’s a New York Times bestselling author. Maybe it’s a guy writing the “great American Novel” in his bedroom. Writing is the easiest hobby there is. And one of the loneliest.

If you get paid to write you are a professional writer. You might be a songwriter. You might get paid to write greeting cards. You might get paid to write novels.

Not everyone who is paid to write is a good writer. Some are terrible. Some are great. Most are just working people, churning out their words.

I’ve written hundreds of thousands of words in my career, probably over a couple million. Some technical books. Hundreds of pages of Microsoft courseware. And these scribblings here for the past several years.

When I wrote the note to my child, I used the skills I’ve learned and developed over the decades. I wrote for clarity. I considered that it would be my child reading it. I love my child. I didn’t want to be overly harsh. I also considered that this would be upsetting news for my child.

Was my note written by a professional writer?

If not, I’m not sure who else we can blame for it.

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Are You One Who Collects All The Things?

I used to be. I’m not anymore. At least I don’t think I am.

You know those Facebook challenges that say to put an X next to every state you’ve been to? Or every country you’ve visited?

I don’t do them anymore. Partly because I don’t remember how many states I’ve been to. I also don’t remember how many countries I’ve visited. Does transfering in the airport count? Or does it only count if you’ve been through immigration? Or maybe a stamp in your passport?

I’ve lived in many states, and I’ve visited many more. I haven’t visited all of them. I know I’ve never been to Hawaii and I think there are some Southern states I may not have been to.

I used to care. I don’t anymore.

My friend Howard Tayler has been writing his web comic Schlock Mercenary for 20 years. He is now writing the last of the story. I interviewed him a couple years ago when he was still plotting out the last book that is now unfolding online.

He publishes his web comic in paper books. When discussing the end of his series he talked about publishing the final book,

And then those of you who want to collect all the things can finally complete your collection.

I collected his books for a while. Rare “unmarked” numbered editions. Eventually, I traded them back to my friend for ordinary versions and gave them to my son who read them voraciously, if not pristinely. I realized I didn’t want to collect all the things.

I collected odd things. When George Lucas brought out an updated version of the original Star Wars triology, I bought both the Gold box (Widescreen) and the Silver box (full screen.)

In fact, I remember watching a movie, I would decide if I wanted to buy the movie. So, that I could have it. I had a lot of movies. I have away a bunch of them.

The same thing with books. I bought entire series. I bought everything by a particular author. Now, I decide if I ever think I might want to read a book again. If so, I keep it. If not, I am more likely to give it away.

We 13 kids, many of whom are adopted, some of my friends joke that I collect children. That didn’t happen, but I have collected other things.

I used to collect Mustang models. I had over 300 “Hot Wheels” sized cars. They are 1/64 scale. And some of them were very rare and expensive. I recently gave my collection to my neighbor’s 6 year old son. He doesn’t appreciate the uniqueness of the collection. He only knows that there are lots of shiny cars.

I really only collect three things any more. The first is pocket watches. And this group is exclusive. Each watch was either a gift from a specific family members or belonged to a family member. I have a watch from my son, my wife, my father, my grandfather and my great grandfather.

I would imagine this collection will get passed down to my children and grandchildren. At least I hope so.

The second thing I collect are challenge coins. They aren’t true challenge coins. None of them are military coins. But, they have the form of challenge coins. Some are from my friend Howard Tayler’s universe. He made them to go along with the web comic. Some are from National or State Parks or Monuments. Some are from Scouting. Some are from other organizations. I’ll build a display case for them at some point. For now, they all sit in my desk drawer.

And finally, I collect baseball caps. I’m kind of a baseball nut and I have a baseball cap from every stadium that I’ve seen a game in.

But, it’s not really about the hats, or the coins. They represent experiences. I don’t buy a hat unless I’ve been to the stadium and watched a game. The hat is a reminder. That game in Pittsburg where we had to drive three hours through a rain storm and had no idea if the game would be cancelled. The game in Arlington, TX that I drove to from Shreveport, LA. It was three hours each way, and a great game with my beleaguered Mariners vs the Texas Rangers.

The coins are similar. I don’t simply collect them unless I’ve been to the place that they refer to. I have one from Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi. It was also a long drive from Shreveport. Yellowstone, Zions, Grand Canyon National Parks. Cedar Breaks National Monument. The Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska. Goblin Valley State Park. And many others.

I guess I still collect some of the things. But my collections have changed. I don’t care if I personally touch every state. I don’t care how many countries I’ve visited. I don’t care to collect books, or models. Instead, I want experiences and mementoes from those experiences. It’s like art. I collect art. I have framed originals. . .most are from my kids. And a couple from people I know who are artists.

Stuff is just stuff and it can be bought and sold. But, memories, live forever. Experiences can’t be taken away.

Those are the things I want to collect now.

What are the things you collect?

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

Follow him on
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or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2020 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

When Day Turns Into Night. . Or Day. . .Or Something

One of the benefits of working from home is the fact that you can work in your pajamas. The commute changed from a trip down the freeway to a trip down the hallway. Your gas milage hasn’t gone up, but your gas costs have certainly gone down.

But, there’s a downside to working at home. Several, in fact. The lack of human interaction can be dehumanizing. No amount of Zoom meetings and conference calls can replace just the simple interaction of saying hello to someone you pass in the breakroom.

Oh sure, maybe your kids can fill that need. And depending on the age of your kids, that might be worse than no interaction at all.

But, one of the other problems with working from home is the calendar. I have a pocket calendar that I used to carry with me all the time. Now it just sort of sits on my desk. I open it occasionally, but I’m not sure what for anymore. Everything is in my office calendar. Not just work events, but family events, birthdays, pretty much everything.

And that’s the problem. I now live in my office. I don’t have the luxery of that commute to separate work life from home life. It’s hard to know when the work day ends. Plus, my job requires me to be involved with tasks at all hours. Earlier this week we had maintenance scheduled starting at 10:00pm. It went until 1:00AM.

Tonight we have testing scheduled to start at 1:00AM. That means I’ll be dragging myself when I get up for work tomorrow. Except, I’m not sure I have work tomorrow. Will I have to get up early? I check my online calendar and it looks like there’s an appointment with someone named Ruth at 9:45 tomorrow morning. Ruth works Saturdays, but generally in the afternoon.

Except that I have a daughter named Ruth. And since tomorrow is Saturday, maybe that’s not a work appointment. And I’m pretty sure it’s not a Zoom meeting since she lives in my house.

So, I’ll be up much of tonight with our testing and I’ll go to my meeting in the morning and I’ll struggle like many of you to keep night and day straight in this crazy world.

Stay Safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren.

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