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What The Plumber Taught Me About My Kids

There was a leak.

It was intermittent.

I never could track it down.

This is why I hate working with water.

I enjoy home repairs. I’m not too terrible at them either. I’ve built walls that didn’t fall down. I’ve wired lights that went on and off successfully. I’ve even done tile and drywall. As I said, I enjoy it.

But, not water.

The problem is that if you do electrical wiring wrong when you flip the circuit breaker it sparks and then trips off. It’s hard to do it wrong. Well, it’s hard to do it wrong and not KNOW you did it wrong.

But, water isn’t like that. Water repairs can LOOK like they are successful and then three months later part of the ceiling falls in. I don’t mind paying a plumber to do the water repairs.

So, there was this intermittent leak coming from an upstairs bathroom into my son’s bedroom. I thought it might be the toilet, so I replaced the wax ring. Still leaked. Appeared to be the shower.

So, I called the plumber. He came today.

He didn’t fix the leak. But, he told ME how to fix the leak. See shower doesn’t leak. The heating vent next to it leaks. Why would a heating vent be leaking? And why intermittently?

Because if you take a shower and you don’t pull the shower curtain all the way to the wall, the water is going to splash on the wall and run down on to the floor. Right where the heating vent is located.

The plumber was able to replace a failed cartridge inside the faucet, so it wasn’t a total loss. And we had an exposed pipe that had a slow leak. He fixed that too. But, really it was the leaky shower that was the reason I was willing to pay him $180 to come make repairs.

So, my leak is fixed. I’ve talked to the kids that shower in that bathroom and explained the need to properly position the curtain. And eventually we’ll get a shower door.

But, until then, it was worth the money to have the plumber tell me how to correct my children.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
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LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

My Biggest Fan

I’m a writer.

But, then, you knew that. That’s why you’re here. If I were a photographer this page would be a lot more colorful. But, I’m a writer, so you get to see words.

I like writing because it’s permanent. When a story, or even a blog post is written down it because a thing. A thing that is real. But, it’s also not real. At it’s simplest it’s characters strung together. Even though this site is backed up, the 1000 or more posts on this site could disappear with a ill-timed computer glitch.

Johnny Depp is currently in the news. Apparently his legal issues are more popular than the baby formula shortage, the war in Ukraine or even the inflation rate. It makes sense I guess. Nearly everyone has seen his movies.

You know who hasn’t seen a Johnny Depp movie? Johnny Depp. He never watches his films. I think he watches other people’s movies. He just doesn’t want to watch his own.

I’m not like that. I kind of like to read the things I’ve written. I write for the local paper. It’s not available online. It’s literally old school. Only available in print form. And you can’t buy it. You can only get it by going to a local Pleasant Grove Business and picking up a copy.

I went to the local Ace Hardware store today. It’s a local Pleasant Grove business. They had the latest copy of The Timpanogos Times. I picked up this months copy.

My column was on page 4. I wrote it only a couple of weeks ago. My editor claimed it made her cry. I read through my column sitting in the parking lot. I didn’t cry. But, I realized why she did. It was not terrible.

Many writers hate editing. I have a novella I’m working on that is over 12,000 words. I’ve read it a dozen times or more. Of course I know how it ends. I would hope so. But, I enjoy reading it. I enjoy some of the clever word play. I like the characters. (Even if some of my beta readers didn’t.)

I like to read what I’ve written. And I love to see my name in print. Books, online or newspapers.

Johnny Depp should try it. I’ve heard he’s pretty good.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

It Was A Sunday

There are savants who, if you tell them a date from history, can tell you what day of the week the date fell on.

I’m not that smart. I only know one.

Forty-two years ago, May 18th fell on a Sunday.

I’m reminded of it every year. I was 15 years old. I was living in Lacey, Washington. And we, my brother and I, were headed to church that morning.

That morning Mount Saint Helens blew 1300 feet off it’s top. The ash cloud was visible from miles. Which is good because we lived about 150 miles north or the mountain. Looking south we could see the ash cloud billowing thousands of feet into the air. And it then drifted toward the east. All across Eastern Washington, Idaho, Montana and more were covered with ash. Despite being as close as we were, the ash didn’t hit our town until the ash made it’s way all the way around the world.

The eruption on May 18 was surprising, but not unexpected. The experts knew an eruption was imminent. But, even with warnings, not everyone was willing to leave. In fact, one old man named Harry Truman insisted he would never leave. He lived in a cabin on the mountain. And he had a generous supply of whisky.

Harry was no doubt killed instantly when the mountain went up.

I’ve thought about Harry over the years. He was old. He knew he would probably die when the mountain blew up. But, he just literally didn’t seem to care. He would rather die on his mountain than live anywhere else.

Do I care about something that much? Certainly not about where I live. But, I think there may be things that I would die for. My family? Sure. Defending the innocent? I’d like to think so.

Are there beliefs that I would die for?

I don’t know. Again, I’d like to think so, but then, we are all the hero of our own story.

Anyway, happy Mt Saint Helens anniversary day. . .even if I’m the only one who celebrates it.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Book Review: In Order To Live

“In Order To Live” has been in my “To Read” pile for months. I don’t remember where I saw the recommendation, but it was inspiring enough that I bought the book, sight unseen.

The recommendation was right.

The paperback version of the book is 267 pages long. And yet, it felt like 50. The story flowed effortlessly. And yet, the details were horrific. Like being in a very comfortable canoe. . .while plunging over a 100 foot waterfall.

It’s fitting that Yeonmi Park wrote a book. Because she is the kind of person you typically only read about in books. “In Order To Live” tells the story of Park’s escape from North Korea and the journey that took her as a 13 year old child through China, Mongolia and finally South Korea. The journey cost her family, money and most of all her innocence.

Park’s experience and her determination to survive no matter the cost is a story that can inspire all of us. No matter the circumstances we find ourselves in, Park gives us an inspiring example of how sheer determination can help carry you through even the worst experiences.

What I Liked

Park’s voice is simple and powerful. Written in collaboration with Maryanne Vollers, the narrative moves seamlessly from episode to episode. Park shares enough detail to make the story engaging without becoming overly dramatic. The picture she paints of North Korea is one that we in the West know is true, but don’t often hear about. It’s a powerful story, powerfully told.

What I Didn’t

This is a memoir. A personal story and Park rarely strays too far from that personal narrative. It does not delve too much into the politics involved. We also don’t hear how Park eventually ends up in the United States. It’s not so much a criticism as an observation.

What It Means To You

Park’s story is important to the world. And it can be valuable to you as well. The truth of the atrocities in North Korea will eventually shed a light on the Hermit Kingdom. However, if you are a victim of domestic violence, domestic abuse or sexual abuse, Park’s story will be hard to read.

My Rating

Four out of Four Stars

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

What Talents Would You Like To Have?

I had a friend who was a talented piano player. Not concert level, but he could play the piano well. He sometimes played for church. He would become annoyed when someone said, “I wish I could play the piano like you do.” 

“Do you? Do you know what I sacrificed to be this good at the piano? Do you know how many times when my friend were out playing baseball I was stuck inside practicing scales? Do you want that? Do you want to make so sacrifices? If not then you don’t really want to play the piano as well as I do.” 

In my opinion, no matter how much I might think I want to be able to play the piano, or the guitar, or be a talented painter. If I’m honest about it, I don’t want those talents enough to make the sacrifices necessary to accomplish them. 

I wish I were better at knowing how to communicate with people. I’ve always been a pretty good speaker. And I can write reasonably well. But, if I were forced to write 250 words and those 250 represented the difference between life and death, I don’t know that I could be compelling and convincing. 

I wish I were a better friend; being one of those people that your friends simply KNOW will be supportive. The kind of friend who shows up in the middle of the night because you need a friend to be there. 

I wish I was a better husband. My lovely wife is patient and kind and spiritual and one of the best people I know. I wish I were as good a husband to her as she’s been a wife to me. 

I wish I was a better father. My father seemed so much wiser than I feel. I’m older than my dad was when I left home. And yet, I often second guess myself. I worry about giving too much advice. And I also worry about not giving enough advice. When should I step in and “fix it” and when should I step back and let natural consequences kick in? I have no idea. I wish I did. 

I want to be a better grandfather, “Papa.” I hope I can impact my grandchildren in a way that they will look back fondly on my memory throughout their lives. 

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Do You Want To Win? Make Them Cry

My editor had an interesting comment about my most recent column.

I don’t think it’s fair to write a column that makes me cry. Just sayin’.

I can honestly say that’s the only time I’ve got that particular feedback. . .as criticism.

She certainly liked my column. And that’s not surprising.

My writing mentor, Dave Farland, gave advice on how to win writing contests. He was the coordinating judge for the Writers of The Future contest.

Every year the winning entry makes the judges cry.

I can’t say I’m particularly good at making readers cry. I’m pretty good at world building. I’m not too terrible at dialogue. And I have a pretty good sense of humor. But, being able to construct a scene designed to make someone cry? That’s harder than it looks.

I used to do stand up comedy. I got reasonably good at it. I had about 15 minutes of good material.

I spent a lot of time at open mics. Invariably there would be someone who was there for the first time. And a lot of people try stand up because, “They are funny. All there friends say they are funny.”

But, here’s the thing. It’s one one thing to be funny when a situation occurs. And that is definitely a skill. But, it’s completely different to be funny ON COMMAND.

Hey, you’re a clown fish. Tell us a joke.
– Finding Nemo

Writing a scene, or a column to make someone cry is the same way. I wrote a series of posts several years ago about having to leave my kids bikes behind during a forced move. It made ME cry. It was very sad. But, it was situational.

The column I wrote for my editor was one of those situational ones. But, it was a happy cry, not sad. It was about my daughter being named 2nd Assistant to Miss Pleasant Grove and also being elected class representative in 2nd grade.

It was more emotional than it sounds.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Bragging On My Beautiful Daughter

As you may know, last month the Pleasant Grove Strawberry Days royalty was chosen. And try as I might, I think a little of my bias might have come through in my writings last month. See, my lovely daughter, Ruth, was competing in the Miss Pleasant Grove pageant. And, not surprisingly, I definitely had my favorite. The pageant was held at the high school auditorium. 

As parents of a contestant, we were invited to come down on Friday to watch the rehearsal. It was inspiring to see the way the girls focused on the directions and the timing and choreography. And, of course, they were all nervous. It’s tempting to think that a pageant is just a “beauty contest.” It’s much more than that. We had some idea of what is involved. Not only does the previous Miss Pleasant Grove, Hailey Howe, live in our neighborhood, my lovely wife was in a pageant when she was younger than my daughter is now. We stayed for part of the rehearsal. Our oldest daughter was Ruth’s assistant. They spent a lot of Saturday getting hair and makeup done. 

On Saturday we showed up like everyone else at the high school. The contestants in a pageant are judged on multiple tasks. And interesting, “beauty” isn’t one of them. They did an interview prior to the night of the pageant. The pageant opened with a combined number with the contestants and Hailey Howe. Then, the girls each performed a talent. And these young women are definitely talented. We were treated to a fiddle solo. Not just a violin piece, an actual fiddle. The crowd definitely got into it. 

There were dance numbers. I can’t think of anything more vulnerable than dressing in a dance outfit and then dancing in front of a crowd of several hundred people. And they were brilliant. One young lady did an explanation of a painting. There was poetry reciting. But, none of them compared to the singers. Maybe I’m partial. But, my daughter totally killed it. She sang a Beyonce song, “I Was Here.” 

I was here, I lived, I loved, I was here

I did, I’ve done, everything that I wanted

And it was more than I thought it would be

I will leave my mark so everyone will know I was here

It was quite an emotional moment for this father. Yes, my little girl, stood up there and belted her heart out. And she was by far the best of the talented group. Was I biased? Sure. But, she really was wonderful. 

The young women also had a portion of the program where they talked about their charity work. Ruth’s program was “Every Kit Counts.” She was collecting for humanitarian aid kits. Some went to Ukraine. Some went to locations in the United States. I think some went to locations in Utah. After describing her volunteer program each young lady was asked a question. They weren’t informed of the questions beforehand. It’s one thing to practice a speech you’ve prepared. It’s another to have to think on your feet and answer questions off the cuff. 

The question that Ruth was asked was something like, “How can you encourage others to be their best self?”

Her answer was brilliant. “I can help others to be their best self by being my own best self. I can show that that it’s okay to be genuine by being genuine myself.” There was more to her answer. It was more more insightful than I’m being able to remember. And she was confident and poised. By far the best response. 

The final event was the evening dress event. The contestants walked around the stage, pausing at certain spots. It was the closest thing to a “beauty” portion. I should explain something about my daughter. She’s. . .not tall. In fact, she’s remarkably short. She has been since the 7th grade. But, she’s also very fashion conscious. She’s been wearing high heels since she was 12 years old. Not all the girls had that much experience. And if you’ve been walking in high heels for eight years, you are going to have a much easier time gliding around the stage. 

And that was it. After those three events, it was time for the judges to make their decision. 

There’s something else you should know about my daughter, she was born in Haiti. She was adopted when she was about four years old. Black kids in Utah kind of stand out. When she was in the second grade we moved from the south side of Pleasant Grove to the east side. It meant our kids switched from Central Elementary to Grovecrest Elementary. Ruth came home from school one day and said, “Daddy, guess what?”

“What sweety?”

“I’m running for class representative!”

Each class elected one person to represent their class in the student council. I was nervous. She was the new girl. And she was a minority. 

“Good luck, sweety.”

I didn’t want her to be disappointed, but I also didn’t want her to not try. That’s one of the hard things about being a parent – giving our kids opportunities, but also recognizing that they might be disappointed. 

I was thinking about that second grade election as I sat in the high school auditorium last month. The judges had made their decision and it was time to call the names. 

“Your second assistant to Miss Pleasant Grove for 2022 is. . .Ruth Bliss.” 

And they put a tiara and a sash on my little girl and I don’t remember anything after that. 

Oh, she also won the election for second grade class representative too. 

I should have never doubted her. 

Congratulations to all the young women who competed. And to the new Miss Pleasant Grove and the first assistant, whoever they are. 

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Suspended Disbelief. . .And Curveballs

Google define a curveball as,

A pitch thrown with a strong downward spin, causing the ball to drop suddenly and veer rot the side as it approaches home plate.

It’s a good enough definition, I guess. It’s not true. Or, at least it’s not completely true.

I’ve heard that when the movie Titanic came out, some people left the theater crying.

“I didn’t know the boat was going to sink!”

I think those stories may have just been over excited journalists looking for a hook. We all knew the ship was going to sink. In fact, it’s the whole reason there’s a movie to be told. Still, we each made the decision to suspend our disbelief and watch the story. Knowing the ending. . .the ultimate ending, didn’t diminish the enjoyment of the storytelling.

Sometimes we don’t, or won’t suspend our disbelief. Today’s Mariners game started at 2:00 PM. I couldn’t watch it. But, I decided I should save it for tonight when I would be writing in my office. The problem was that I couldn’t get to the game without first seeing the score.

Believe me, I tried. Nope. Phillies beat the Mariners 4-2 in Seattle. Guess what I didn’t do this evening? Right, I didn’t watch a game that I already knew the outcome of.

Even thought the game was decided hours before I attempted to watch it, so long as I could suspend my disbelief, I was willing to watch. In fact, I was looking forward to watching.

The curveball is a lie. What’s make a curveball such a devastating pitch is that it refuses to follow the laws of physics. The ball is on a predictable trajectory and then it suddenly veers into a completely different direction. Almost as if someone pushed it.

Candy Cummings invented the curveball in the 1870s. The pitch was not natural. And in fact was banned for a time. Today, it’s one of the most devastating pitches in baseball. It’s the reason that Michael Jordan gave up on his dream to play Major League Baseball. He couldn’t hit it.

Star Trek even had an episode that featured a curveball. Data, the android, was on the holodeck playing a game of baseball. He strikes out on a curveball. Riker says, “It’s an optical illusion.”

That’s also not true.

Curveballs only work because a baseball has raised stitches, 216 of them to be exact. When a pitcher throws a curveball he flicks his wrist on the release to give the ball a very fast spin. That spin is so fast that air gets trapped around the ball. The ball, for a short amount of time acts like it’s a perfect sphere rather than a sphere with raised stitches. Eventually the ball slows enough that the stitches catch the air. It’s at that moment that the ball “breaks.” And it can break by as much as 6″ off it’s expected trajectory. Enough to make big league ball players look foolish swinging at empty air.

Lyman Briggs, a scientist and baseball fan figured out the physics of the curveball in 1959, about 80 years after it was first used. Prior to that (and for many people after) the curveball was thought to be an optical illusion.

Pitchers, even modern pitchers, probably don’t care about the science of the curveball. They simply know that if they grip it a certain way and throw it a particular way, the ball will dive across the plate.

Suspending our disbelief is not required to appreciate a curveball. But, it is a deliberate choice on our part when we go see a movie, or when we watch a sporting event on “tape delay.”

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

Two Gallons – Three Containers

Last weekend I replaced the thermostat in my lovely wife’s car. (I Wasn’t Sure That Was Going To Work.) When you replace the thermostat, (it looks like this, BTW)

You have to drain out most of the radiator coolant. The Yukon my lovely wife drives takes 18 quarts of antifreeze. That’s four and a half gallons. I didn’t have to replace all of it, but I certainly needed to replace several gallons.

Antifreeze comes in two flavors and two strengths. The two flavors are green and orange. Generally Japanese cars take green antifreeze. American cars typically take orange. Those are BROAD generalizations. Not every car follows that rule. But, if you are replacing, or even topping off the anti freeze, you should check and figure out which flavor your car needs. It’s not a good idea to mix them.

The Yukon takes orange antifreeze.

The two strengths are “diluted” and ‘full strength.’ If you buy the diluted strength you can immediately add it to your car. It costs about $14 per gallon. If you get full strength, you have to dilute it. Literally you cut it 50/50 with water. And not just ANY water. Tap water is TERRIBLE for your radiator. There’s minerals in tap water that will clog up your radiator.

So, I had a gallon of full strength orange antifreeze and a gallon of distilled water. I also had an empty antifreeze container.

Question: How to ensure they are evenly mixed?

The question would have been easy if the antifreeze containers had a spot on the side to show how full they are. Some antifreeze containers have that. And all containers of oil have it. Unfortunately mine did not.

I could guess, right? I pour “about” half the antifreeze into the empty container and then top it off with water. But, I’m not going to be exact. Chances are 50/50 that I’ll put too much antifreeze in one container and then realize it when I go to fill it up with water. I would be stuck at that point. I would have diluted antifreeze that I couldn’t correct.

I suppose I could have poured the water into the empty container, then poured half the antifreeze into the opaque water jug.

I came up with a different solution that didn’t involve quite so much pouring back and forth.

I poured slightly less than half of the antifreeze into the empty container. Then, I poured exactly half the water into that same container. I then “topped off” that container with antifreeze. Since I knew there was exactly a half gallon of water and the container was a one gallon container, I didn’t have to measure the antifreeze. I just had to make sure there was less than half a gallon when started.

It’s not quite the riddle from Die Hard. But, I felt pretty pleased. (And the car no longer was overheating, so that was a bonus.)

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

I Wasn’t Sure That Was Going To Work

In fact, I was pretty sure it wasn’t going to work.

My lovely wife drives a 2005 Yukon. It’s our “big” car while I drive a 1994 Toyota Corolla. When we are running errands together we take her car. Last week it was overheating. Just driving around, the coolant temperature would spike. It even started displaying COOLANT HOT in the display screen.

Do you know what you do when your car overheats?

First you check the coolant level. If that’s okay, the second thing is to replace the thermostat.

So, Saturday morning, it was off to the parts store to get a new thermostat and then to Walmart to get orange antifreeze.

PRO TIP: Don’t buy your antifreeze or oil at the auto parts store. You’ll save a lot of money by making a second stop at Walmart.

Every auto repair has three stages

  1. Disassembly
  2. Repair
  3. Reassembly

And the quickest of the three is the actual repair. I pulled off air filters and disconnected radiator hoses and just to get to the thermostat housing. It has two bolts. Once it’s out, then it’s a simple job to clean up the area where the seal sits. And replace the thermostat.

Then, it’s reassembly. That’s is sometimes the longest part. After I got it all put back together, I started the engine and let it run.

I was actually surprised when the temperature went to 220 and then didn’t budge.

Maybe my mechanic knew what he was talking about.

I’m just glad it worked.

Stay safe

Rodney M Bliss is an author, columnist and IT Consultant. His blog updates every weekday. He lives in Pleasant Grove, UT with his lovely wife, thirteen children and grandchildren. Order Miscellany II, an anthology including his latest short story, “The Mercy System” here

Follow him on
Twitter (@rodneymbliss)
Facebook (www.facebook.com/rbliss)
LinkedIn (www.LinkedIn.com/in/rbliss)
or email him at rbliss at msn dot com

(c) 2022 Rodney M Bliss, all rights reserved

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